Why It Hurts When You’re Having Sex

Hurts so good? Not so much. Lovemaking is supposed to be more pleasurable than painful. So if you’re feeling discomfort on a regular basis, it’s time to get a tune-up and see just what’s going on down there.

The medical term for pain during sex is dyspareunia, and a number of factors can contribute to the ache. When moaning turns to groaning, it’s time to get to the root of the problem.

The underlying issues may be physical, structural or psychological in nature. It’s important to address the issue because avoiding the topic and neglecting your symptoms could cause problems in your sexual relationship, as well as your emotional health.

Below we discuss some of the most common causes of dyspareunia, the general symptoms of each and what you can do to ease the pain.

Endometriosis

Endometriosis is a condition in which the lining of the uterus – the endometrium – grows outside of the uterus. It often affects other structures in the pelvic region. Unfortunately, these growths can cause intense pain during intercourse.

According to Everyday Health, more than half the women afflicted with endometriosis experience significant discomfort. Talk to your doctor about possible medical treatments, which may include hormone therapy to reduce the growths, and in some cases, surgery.

Vaginusmus

Another cause of pain during sex is vaginusmus, an odd-sounding medical term that simply means involuntary spasms or contractions of the vaginal muscles. Women frequently describe the sensation as burning, tearing or having “hit a wall,” explains The Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada. The tightening itself doesn’t hurt; it’s only with penetration when pain occurs.

For those with vaginusmus, pain can occur during:

  • sex;
  • medical exams; or
  • tampon insertion.

The reflex may be the result of fear of pain from a previous trauma. There are certain exercises that can help patients overcome the condition. Discuss the issue with your doctor.

Uterine Fibroids

Uterine fibroids are benign growths than many women develop but do not know they have.

There are a number of symptoms that indicate the presence of uterine fibroids, including:

  • back pain;
  • heavy menstrual bleeding;
  • pelvic pain; and
  • bladder problems.

Fibroids can make sex very uncomfortable or painful. It may worsen during certain parts of the menstrual cycle. If fibroids develop on the cervix near the cervical opening, this intensifies the pain. Fibroids also may begin to affect the libido because they can throw the hormones out of whack.

Generally, fibroids are a non-life-threatening condition. If fibroids cause uncomfortable symptoms, speak to your doctor about treatment options.

Emotional Issues

Sometimes pain during sex can be attributed to emotional or psychological issues. Negative emotions often cause an array of problems in terms of intimacy and sex. For instance, fears, memories or angst can prevent a person from relaxing. Guilt factors or a history of sexual abuse may stifle a woman’s ability to enjoy intercourse.

Emotional disturbances can prevent a woman from becoming aroused and creating natural lubrication, which inevitably leads to pain during sex, explains the Rubino OB/GYN Group in New Jersey. If you suspect that pain during sex is psychological in nature, consider therapy with a qualified sex therapist. The American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors, and Therapists is a good starting point for referrals, Rubino notes.

Inadequate Lubrication

You may be hurting during sex because of a lubrication issue. Lack of adequate natural lubrication and vaginal dryness can be very painful during intercourse. There are a number of possible causes of inadequate lubrication, including hormonal imbalances (childbirth and menopause) and certain health conditions.

Also, there are a number of commonly used medications that may reduce lubrication, according to the Mayo Clinic, including:

  • antidepressants;
  • high blood pressure medications;
  • sedatives;
  • antihistamines; and
  • certain birth control pills.

In most cases, a simple, over-the-counter water-based lubricant does the job.

Other Reasons for Pain during Sex

WebMD cites several other possibilities for pain during intercourse, including:

  • vaginal infections;
  • issues with the cervix;
  • ovarian cysts;
  • inflammatory diseases;
  • ectopic pregnancy;
  • sexually transmitted diseases; and
  • injury to the vagina, such as tearing during childbirth.

Ways to Treat the Pain

Treatment options depend on the condition causing the pain. For example, menopause-induced lubrication issues may be remedied with hormone replacement or artificial lubricants. More serious conditions, such as severe endometriosis, may require surgery.

According to Everyday Health, John C. Petrozza, MD, board-certified obstetrician-gynecologist at Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Center offers these tips for easing the pain during sex. Although they are geared toward endometriosis-related pain, they also may relieve symptoms in other situations:

  • try side-to-side or “doggy style” positions in lieu of missionary, which is the most uncomfortable position because of the tilt of the pelvis;
  • pick the least painful times of your menstrual cycle to have sex. Most women experience more endometrial pain mid-cycle, so you might want to forgo sex during those few days;
  • talk to your partner about the pain to keep communication open. Having him or her involved in what you’re going through can make you feel understood and avoid misconstruing your physical pain as a relationship issue; and
  • consider kissing, fondling and massage as alternatives when there’s discomfort.

When It’s Time to See the Doctor

If sex is becoming a pain, your best bet is to visit a doctor and determine the root cause. It the problem persists, it could be something more serious. Your physician will examine your medical history, perform an exam, and may or may not order additional tests.

The Cleveland Clinic makes it clear when to see a physician: “Contact your doctor if there are symptoms such as bleeding, genital lesions, irregular periods, vaginal discharge, or involuntary vaginal muscle contractions.” It also recommends seeing a certified sex counselor if you experience pain that has no underlying medical explanation.

Remaining mum on intimacy issues won’t help resolve the issue. It’s important to be proactive and take the necessary steps to get to the bottom of your issues. The health of your relationship may depend on it.

What Is The Best Age To Get Pregnant?

Getting Pregnant In 20s 30s 40s What Is The Best Age To Get Pregnant Let me explain you why you should get pregnant at the right age.

Never in history have ladies had as much control over their fertility and family arranging choices as we do today.

With simple access to contraception and the boundless accessibility of regenerative innovations, couples can choose when they need to start their family.

But how does a couple’s fertility change with time? Let’s find out.

Fertility in Your 20s

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A Womens’s fertility starts to decrease starting in her 30s, with a more critical decay after the age of 35. Every month, there’s lone a 20 percent possibility of pregnancy for a lady in her 30s, as indicated by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM).

The danger for unnatural birth cycle and hereditary variations from the norm likewise starts to ascend after age 35. You may confront more entanglements in your pregnancy and/or amid conveyance. Your specialist may likewise prescribe extra screening and testing for you and infant.

Egg solidifying is still a choice in your 30s, however you will most likely not have the capacity to solidify the same number of eggs as a sound Women in her 20s. You may need to experience numerous cycles keeping in mind the end goal to solidify a decent number of eggs.

Fertility in Your 30s

BestAge_Pregnancy02_30s

A woman’s fertility begins to decline beginning in her 30s, with a more significant decline after the age of 35. Each month, there’s only a 20 percent chance of pregnancy for a woman in her 30s, according to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM).

The risk for miscarriage and genetic abnormalities also begins to rise after age 35. You might face more complications in your pregnancy and/or during delivery. Your doctor might also recommend additional screening and testing for you and baby.

Egg freezing is still an option in your 30s, but you will probably not be able to freeze as many eggs as a healthy woman in her 20s. You might need to go through multiple cycles in order to freeze a good number of eggs.

Fertility in Your 40s

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There is a precarious decrease in the capacity of a women to get pregnant normally in her 40s. Despite the fact that we as a whole realize that lady who got pregnant at 44 years of age, this doesn’t happen all the time.

Women’s confront a higher rate of trouble getting pregnant every year after age 35. Truth be told, by ASRM, a lady has just a 5 percent possibility of pregnancy every month once she turns 40.

When we see famous people getting pregnant in their mid to late 40s, we won’t not know the specifics. They may have experienced different cycles of in vitro treatment (IVF), or even have utilized an egg contributor to get pregnant.

It’s likewise critical to perceive that pregnancy and conveyance gets harder as a lady ages. Ladies may have wellbeing issues that make getting pregnant risky too.

Restorative conditions like gestational diabetes and preeclampsia are more basic in more seasoned ladies. Extra testing and checking may be expected to search for potential entanglements.

Male Fertility

Since we’ve talked about female fruitfulness through the ages, you’re presumably inquisitive about what happens to men as they get more seasoned.

A man’s Fertility declines as he gets more established. In any case, this procedure happens later, more often than not around age 60. Men additionally see a decrease in sexual working as they age. The sperm cells of a more established man will probably have hereditary variations from the norm than those of a more youthful man.

This doesn’t imply that a man in his 60s or 70s can’t father youngsters. However, it may be somewhat more troublesome.

At the point when to Get Help

It’s a great opportunity to see a fruitfulness pro if a lady who is less than 35 years old is not pregnant inside a year. In the event that a lady more than 35 isn’t pregnant inside six months, she ought to see her specialist.

Couples with known hereditary infections or the individuals who have had numerous unnatural birth cycles ought to likewise check in with their specialist or richness expert.

Takeaways

Things being what they are, what is the best time to get pregnant? Indeed, that is dependent upon you. Youngsters are costly and it’s not nonsensical to hold up until you feel more sure about your profession and funds to begin constructing your family. Yet, realize that holding up too long can make it extremely troublesome, and at times incomprehensible, to get pregnant.

When Are You Too Old to Have Babies?

Many life circumstances and decisions are putting off baby making for couples of all ages. With a higher divorce rate, it might be that the second or third marriage is the charm. But by then, is it too late?

Many men and women are putting off having kids to focus on their educations and careers, and with so many older celebrities giving birth, it may seem like a no-brainer to delay conception. Certainly it’s sensible to wait until you’re ready to have kids, and researchers say the optimal time is somewhere in the mid-20s to early 30s.

The truth is that biology can limit older men and women’s abilities to conceive and carry a fetus to term. However, it’s not impossible for those in their late 30s, 40s or even beyond to have a child. Experts recommend if you’re trying to get pregnant after 35 and it doesn’t happen naturally within six months, it’s a good idea to see a specialist.

If menopause has set in or other factors inhibit pregnancy, then there are other ways to have a child – gestational carriers, or surrogates, may carry a child for a mother who cannot carry to term. Or donor eggs and/or sperm may be used and implanted in the mother. Regardless of these workarounds, the hard truth is that women are born with all the eggs their bodies will make during a lifetime. Those eggs’ quality decreases over time, and the same thing happens with mens’ sperm, though they keep manufacturing it. The testicular cells age, and as they do, sperm production decreases. So infertility in the late 30s and beyond can’t necessarily be blamed on the woman. So if you can conceive, should you?  The risks to the baby are mentioned quite a bit when talking about older people having kids.

Mayoclinic cites the increase in spontaneous miscarriages – up to 51 percent in women aged 40-44. And the risk of having a baby with significant chromosomal abnormalities is higher – about 1 in 200 – after age 35. The risk of having a child with Down Syndrome is 1 in 365. Only you and your partner can weigh the odds and figure out if having a child later in life is best for you and your family.